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Strength

The Versatile Kettlebell Is The King Of Single-Weight Workouts – Here’s A Full Body Session

Matt Ray

That classic training aid, the kettlebell, is beloved by PTs the world over for its versatility and effective exercises, which tax the muscles and fire up the metabolism, like no other. This makes it ideal for golfers who want to mimic players such as Bryson DeChambeau, and add power and poise to their game by strengthening the posterior chain of muscles that run from the ankle to the neck.

It’s this movement chain that’s so crucial for generating force off the ground, and converting it into club head speed. So being able to target it with a single weight, in a fast-paced, body conditioning workout is a real boon. Use the following exclusive workout, either at home or in the gym, to achieve this…

“Strength endurance, low impact cardio, power development, strength, coordination and muscle building is what kettlebells have to offer”

Why Kettlebells? The ergonomic handle and centered point of gravity make the kettlebell a stable weight that you can swing around without fear of losing control, once you’ve had a bit of practice. “Strength endurance, low impact cardio, power development, strength, coordination and muscle building is what kettlebells have to offer,” top strength and fitness coach at Six3Nine personal training, Clint Kelly, tells me.

“This single tool can be a game changer for those seeking to invest in a single piece of training equipment that doubles up its appeal in training value when limited space is an issue. Suitable for the gym and home workouts, kettlebells prove we don’t ‘need’ a fully kitted gym set up to make the most of our workouts.” The following workout will utilize some explosive power, posterior chain enhancement and fundamentals of momentum management.

How To Do This Workout Do A and B twice per week for a whole-body training boost that you can do in isolation, or add to a larger exercise program. Do the number of sets and reps as indicated in the text, using a single kettlebell. Try a 10kg-16kg weight range, depending on your size and exercise experience, and make sure you read and execute the form guidance from Clint Kelly to avoid injury. (If you are returning to exercise or are working out for the first time, make sure you check with your doctor first.)

KETTLEBELL WORKOUT

A1. Kettlebell Single Arm Swing, Sets: 4 Reps: 15 Rest: 0 seconds (keep alternating arms) “Hold the kettlebell in one hand, approximately two feet away from you. Then ‘hike’ the kettlebell back for the pre-swing, allowing the wrist to touch the top of the inner thigh before aggressively driving the hips forward, projecting the kettlebell through the legs and using the arm to guide it to shoulder height, before allowing it to return into the pre-swing position,” says Clint Kelly.

A2. Front Rack Reverse Lunge, Sets: 4 Reps: 8 Rest: 10 seconds “‘Rack the kettlebell in the crease of the arms, holding it close to the body. Keeping your weight balanced in the front foot, take a moderate step back, allowing the rear knee to descend towards the floor, before returning to the top and bringing the feet back to their starting position.”

A3. Kettlebell Push Press, Sets: 4 Reps: 8 Rest: 20 seconds “Starting from the rack position, dip the knees and aggressively extend both the knees, and drive the arm up overhead, sharing the weight between the legs and the shoulders. Control the overhead position before allowing the kettlebell to descend into the rack position, once more.”

A4. Kettlebell Bent Over Row, Sets: 4 Reps: 12 Rest: 60 seconds “Lower the kettlebell to the side and hinge the hips back ensuring a comfortable neutral position with the spine. Once balanced, begin to pull the elbows towards the hip, squeezing the muscles towards the outside of the back into a peak contraction. Then simply allow the kettlebell to return into the starting position.”

FINISHERS

B1. Kettlebell Swing, Sets: 4 Reps: 50 Rest: 60 seconds “Hold the kettlebell in two hands, approximately two feet away from you. Then ‘hike’ the kettlebell back for the pre-swing, allowing the wrist of both hands to touch the top of the inner thighs before aggressively driving the hips forward. Project the kettlebell through the legs and use the arms to guide it to shoulder height before allowing it to return into the pre-swing position.”

B2. Kettlebell Front Rack March, Sets: 3 Reps: 20 Rest: 30 seconds “Starting with the kettlebell in a front rack position, brace the core and send the free arm out for balance. Remaining in an upright position at all times, lift one knee as high as possible while stabilizing through the core and the other standing leg. Return the leg to the ground and repeat on the other side.

“Make sure that you do not allow the body to ‘bend’ from side to side when marching. This exercise can be performed both on the spot, or marching down a track.”

WHAT NEXT? Want another single-weight workout? Then check out this dumbbell full body blast.

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Photos: Adobe Stock